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SEND

Aims of this SEND Information Report

From September 2014, the SEND Reforms place a statutory requirement on schools to make information available to parents about how the school supports children and young people with

Aims of this SEND policy

The aims of our special educational need and disability policy and practice at Tittensor are:

  • To make reasonable adjustments for those with a disability by ensuring increased access to the curriculum, the environment and to printed information for all
  • To ensure that children and young people with SEN engage in the activities of the school alongside pupils who do not have SEN
  • To reduce barriers to progress by embedding the principles in the National Curriculum Inclusion statement https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-curriculum
  • To use our best endeavours to secure special educational provision for pupils for whom this is required, that is "additional to and different from" that provided within the differentiated curriculum to better respond to the four areas of need:
  1. Communication and interaction
  2. Cognition and learning
  3. Social, mental and emotional health
  4. Sensory/physical
  • To request, monitor and respond to parent/carers' and pupils' views in order to evidence high levels of confidence and partnership  
  • To ensure a high level of staff expertise to meet pupil need, through well-targeted continuing professional development.
  • To support pupils with medical conditions full inclusion in all school activities by ensuring consultation with health and social care professionals
  • To work in cooperative and productive partnership with the Local Authority and other outside agencies, to ensure there is a multi-professional approach to meeting the needs of all vulnerable learners.

What are special educational needs?

A child or young person has special educational needs if he or she has a learning difficulty or disability which calls for special educational provision to be made for him or her.  A learning difficulty or disability is a significantly greater difficulty in learning than the majority of others of the same age. Special educational provision means educational or training provision that is additional to, or different from, that made generally for others of the same age in a mainstream setting in England…. Health care provision or social care provision which educates or trains a child or young person is to be treated as special educational provision.  Code of Practice 2014

How does our school know if children need extra help? (Schedule 1: Point 1)

We know when pupils need help if:

  • Concerns are raised by parents/carers, teachers, or the pupil's previous school
  • The teachers regularly monitor the rates of progress for all children.
  • Teachers observing and talking to children indicates that they have additional needs in one of the four areas  
  1. Communication and interaction
  2. Cognition and learning
  3. Social, mental and emotional health
  4. Sensory/physical 

What should I do if I think my child may have special educational needs? (Schedule 1: Points 3 and 6)

At Tittensor First School we encourage positive collaboration between home and school. Parents/carers will be listened to. Views  and aspirations of parents/ carers are central to the care of your child and are also central to the assessment and provision that is provided by school.

  • If you have concerns then please firstly discuss these with your child's teacher.
  • This then may result in a referral to the school SENCos whose name is Mrs Mather and who can be contacted through the school office  telephone 01782 372539
  • School has an open door policy and parents are welcome to call in to school after school to see the Headteacher and Mrs Mather.
  • ( Appointments  can be made as appropriate )

How will I know how the school supports my child? (Schedule 1: Points 1 and 2)

  1. The teacher will have the highest possible expectations for your child and all pupils in their class. Teaching is based on building what your child already knows, can do and can understand.
  • All pupils will be provided with high quality teaching that is differentiated by groups and to meet the diverse needs of all learners. 
  • Pupils with a disability will be provided with "reasonable adjustments" in order to increase their access to the taught curriculum.
  • The quality of teaching is monitored through a number of processes that includes:
  1. classroom observation by the senior leadership team, the SENCo  and external verifiers
  2. ongoing assessment of progress made by pupil in specific intervention groups
  3. work sampling on a termly basis.
  4. scrutiny of planning.
  5. teacher meetings with the SENCo 
  6. pupil and parent feedback when reviewing target attainment
  7. whole school pupil progress tracking
  8. attendance and behaviour records 

 

  • All pupils have  curriculum targets set in line with national outcomes to ensure ambition.  These are discussed with parents at events such as Parents Evenings and pupils' attainments to meet these targets are tracked using the whole school tracking system. 
  • Pupils who are failing to make expected levels of progress are identified very quickly and are discussed in termly meetings that are undertaken between the class teacher, the SENCO and the Headteacher.
  • Where it is decided that action is required to support increased rates of progress, a graduated approach will be followed (an assess, plan, do and review model)
  • An individual assessment of the pupil will be undertaken in order to make an accurate assessment of their needs.  Parents will always be invited to this early discussion to support the identification of action to improve outcomes.
  • Additional action to increase the rate of progress will be then identified and recorded that will include a review of the impact of the differentiated teaching being provided to the child, and if required, provision to the teacher of additional strategies to further support the success of the pupil.  
  • If review of the action taken indicates that "additional to and different from" support will be required, then the views of all involved including the parents and the pupil will be obtained and appropriate evidence-based interventions identified,  recorded and implemented by the class  teacher with advice from the SENCo
  • Parents will be informed that the school considers their child may require SEN support and their partnership sought in order to improve attainments.
  • SEN support will be recorded on a plan that will identify a clear set of expected outcomes, which will include stretching and relevant academic and developmental targets. Progress towards these outcomes will be tracked and reviewed termly with the parents and the pupil.
  • If progress rates are still judged to be inadequate despite the delivery of high quality interventions, advice will be sought from external agencies regarding strategies to best meet the specific needs of a pupil. This will help the school and yourself understand your child's particular  needs better and  will only be undertaken after parent permission has been obtained. This  may include referral to:
  1. Special Educational Needs Support Service (SENSS) 
  2. Behaviour Support Service
  3. Dyslexia Centres
  4. Autism Outreach Team
  5. Hearing Impairment team
  6. Visual Impairment team
  7. Educational Psychologist Service
  8. Educational Welfare Officers
  9. Physical and disability support service
  10. Social Services
  11. School Nurse
  12. CAMHS (Child & Adolescent Mental Health Service)
  13. For a very small percentage of pupils, whose needs are significant and complex and the special educational provision required to meet their needs cannot reasonably be provided from within the school's own resources, a request will be made to the local authority to conduct an assessment of education, health and care needs.  This may results in an Education, Health and Care (EHC) plan being provided.
  • For pupils who despite relevant and purposeful action taken to meet their special needs, fail to make expected levels of progress, the school or parents may consider requesting an Education, Health and Care assessment that will be undertaken by the Local Authority.  

How will the curriculum be matched to my child's needs?

  • Teachers plan using pupils' achievement levels, differentiating work to better match ability to work provided for all pupils in the classroom.  When a pupil has been identified as having special needs, their work will be further differentiated by the class teacher to remove barriers to learning and enable them to access the curriculum more easily.   In addition they will be provided with additional support that may include specialised equipment or resources, ICT and/or additional adult help. 

How will I know how my child is doing?

  • Attainments towards the identified outcomes will be shared with parents termly. This is through Parent's Evenings, the SEN review meetings twice each year and  also as when arranged.  Parents may also find the home-school diary a useful tool to use to communicate with school staff.
  • Parents are encouraged to arrange an appointment to discuss their child's progress with the class teacher, the SENCo. or the Headteacher.  Please contact the school office who will arrange one for you. 
  • Certificates are given out at the weekly achievement assembly.

How will you help me to support my child's learning? (Schedule 1: Point 6)

  • The class teacher or SENCo may also suggest additional ways of supporting your child's learning. Homework is set by the class teacher and is given on a weekly basis to consolidate children's knowledge. Sometimes there are homework clubs.
  • Children are encouraged to choose their reading books from the school reading scheme and will be changed regularly, when finished, with assistance from the Class Teacher or Teaching Assistant. All children can also supplement their reading by choosing a library book, from our new and well stocked school library.
  • A meeting is arranged in the Autumn Term for parents/carers to meet their child's new class teacher. Curriculum details and the day to day routines of the class will be discussed, as well as an opportunity being given for any questions to be asked.

What support will there be for my child's overall well-being?

The school offers a wide variety of pastoral support for pupils. These include:

  1. The Social, Emotional (SEAL) curriculum  aims to provide pupils with the knowledge, understanding and skills they need to enhance their emotional and social knowledge and well-being.  The topics covered include: New Beginnings, Getting On and Falling Out, Going for Goals, Good to be Me, Relationships and Change.
  • Each class agrees a charter with rules which enable the classroom to run smoothly. This happens at the beginning of the school year.
  • We have a school council which meets regularly  and older pupils are encouraged to take on roles of responsibility such as sports leaders and playground buddy mentors.
  • Pupil and Parent voice mechanisms are in place and are monitored for effectiveness by the Governor for responsibility for this area. 
  • Small group evidence-led interventions to support pupil's wellbeing are delivered to targeted pupils and groups.  These are identified on our provision maps and aim to support improved interaction skills, emotional resilience and wellbeing. For example we  have a Nurture group which meets twice each week..
  • The school has completed the Anti-bullying Pledge and is audited annually for its provision in regard to ensuring pupils safety by external agencies.

Pupils with medical needs

  • Pupils with medical needs will be provided with a detailed Health Care Plan, compiled by the school nurse in partnership with parents and if appropriate, the pupil themselves.  Staff who administer medicine complete training and are signed off by the school nurse as competent.  All medicine administration procedures adhere to the LA policy and DfE guidelines included within Supporting pupils at school with medical conditions (DfE) 2014  
  • If there is a medical emergency, a first aider or appropriately trained adult will administer aid to the child and a member of senior staff will be alerted. The family and, if needed, an ambulance will be called. This is then recorded in the school accident book.
     

What training do the staff supporting children and young people with SEND undertake? (Schedule 1: Point 4)

In the last three years school staff have received a range of training at three levels; awareness, enhanced and specialist. 

Awareness training has been provided to all staff including teaching assistants: Some of this training includes:

  • How to support pupils with a diagnosis of dyslexia.
  • How to support pupils on the autistic spectrum
  • How to support pupils with behavioural difficulties
  • How to support pupils with speech, language and communication difficulties
  • Attachment and bereavement (bereavement training for 1 member of staff.)

Enhanced training has been provided to Teaching Assistants and teachers:

  • Fischer Family Trust (reading and writing, talk in colour)
  • Talking Partners 
  • Attendance at the termly SENCo Update   
  • Specialist training has been provided to the SENCo on:
  • The SEN Coordination award.
  • The school has regular visits from SENSS specialist teachers and the Behaviour Support Team who provide advice to staff support the success and progress of individual pupils.   
  • The Governor with specific responsibility for SEN has completed the SEN Governor training.  
  • In addition to this the school has received the full Dyslexia status in April 2012.

How will my child be included in activities outside the classroom including school trips?

  • Risk assessments are carried out and procedures are put in place to enable all children to participate in all school activities.
  • School activities such as school clubs are included in our inclusive school.
  • Children are supervised at all times during play, break times and during PE. Sometimes this may be on a one to one basis if this best supports the child's individual needs.

How accessible is the school environment?

In the last three years the following adaptations have been made to the school environment:

  • Disabled parking spot marked and located next to the school reception  
  • All  internal steps edged with yellow to ensure they are easier for those with visual impairments to negotiate
  • Ramps have been installed near the two playgrounds in school to ensure the site is accessible to all.
  • The toilet in the community room ensures accessibility for visitors with a disability
  • A medical room is available for use.

Our Accessibility Plan that describes the actions the school has taken to increase access to the environment, the curriculum and to printed information is available via the school website. 

How will the school prepare and support my child when joining or transferring to a new school? 

We recognise that moving on can be difficult for a child with SEN and or disabilities and we take steps to ensure that transition is  as smooth as possible. These include:  

On entry:-

  • A planned programme of visits are provided in the summer term for pupils starting in September.   
  • Parent/carers are invited to a meeting at the school and are provided with a range of information to support them in enabling their child to settle into the school routine.   
  • The SENCo meets with all new parents of pupils who are known to have SEND to allow concerns to be raised and solutions to any perceived challenges to be located prior to entry.   
  • If pupils are transferring from another school, the previous school records will be requested immediately and a meeting will be set up with parents to identify and reduce any concerns. 

 

Transition to the next school (Schedule 1: Point 6)

  • The transition programme in place for pupils in Y4 provides a number of opportunities for pupils and parents to meet staff in the new school.  These opportunities are further enhanced for pupils with SEN.
  • Parents will be encouraged to consider options for the next phase of education and the school will involve outside agencies, as appropriate, to ensure information is comprehensive but accessible.
  • Parents will be enabled to consider options for the next phase of education and may like to take advantage of the support offered by the independent Staffordshire School Choice.  Information on this service is located on the Staffordshire website at http://www.staffordshire.gov.uk/education/schoolsandcolleges/admissions/schoolchoice/homepage.aspx ,
  • Accompanied visits to other providers may be arranged as appropriate. 
  • For pupils transferring to local schools, the SENCos of both schools will meet to discuss the needs of pupils with SEN in order to ensure a smooth transition.   
  • The records of pupils who leave the school mid phase will be transferred within five working days of the parents notifying their child has been enrolled at another school.

How are the school's resources allocated and matched to children's special educational needs? (Schedule 1: Point 5)

The school receives funding to respond to the needs of pupils with SEND from a number of sources: Provision is matched to the child according to what the school is able to provide from the provision map. A proportion of the funds allocated per pupil to the school to provide for their education (the Age Weighted Pupil Unit); The Notional SEN budget: The Pupil Premium funding for pupils who meet certain criteria.  In addition, for those pupils with the most complex needs, the school may be allocated Additional Educational Needs funding.  This funding is then used to provide the equipment and facilities to support pupils with special educational needs and disabilities through:

  • In-class support from teaching assistants
  • Small group support from teaching assistants e.g. nurture groups, literacy and numeracy support
  • Bought in support from external agencies e.g. key learning centre, speech and language support.
  • Parent workshops
  • Curriculum training relating to SEND for staff

How is the decision made about how much support my child will receive?

  • For pupils with SEN but without an Education Health and Care plan, the decision regarding the support required will be taken at joint meetings with the SENCo, classteacher and parent.   For pupils with a statement of educational needs/Education, Health or Care plan, this decision will be reached when the plan is being produced or annual review.  

How will I be involved in discussions about and planning for my child's education? 

This may be through:

  • discussions with the class teacher, SENCO or senior leadership team member
  • during parents evenings
  • SEN review meetings 

Who can I contact for further information or if I have any concerns? (Schedule 1: Point 7)

If you wish to discuss your child's educational needs or are unhappy about something regarding your child's schooling please contact the following:
Your child's class teacher

  • The SENCo (E Proffitt)
  • The Headteacher (E Proffitt)
  • For complaints please contact the School Governor with responsibility for SEN.  This is  Mrs J Avann.
  • Staffordshire Local Education Authority has developed a 'Local Offer' which signposts all services available to support disabled children with SEN (from 0 – 25 years old) and their families across Staffordshire and Stoke-On-Trent. It provides parents/carers with information about how to access services in their area and what they can expect from those services.
  •  ( www.staffordshiremarketplace.co.uk)

Support services for parents of pupils with SEN include:

 
To find out more about the Staffordshire County Council Local Offer or how you can get involved please contact our SEND Team by emailing: senddp@staffordshire.gov.uk